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Physical Well-Being

  • Murray calls for overhaul of VA Choice program

    Type of content: News

    The former chairwoman of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee wants to overhaul the VA Choice program — the initiative that lets veterans see private physicians if they can’t get an appointment at a VA medical center.

    Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said veterans in her state continue to wait weeks or months for needed medical care, unable to make timely appointments at the VA or through the Choice program.

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    Legislation
    Mental Health
    Physical Well-Being
    VA
  • Health care reforms already underway, VA insists

    Type of content: News

    Congressional critics say Department of Veterans Affairs health offerings need to be overhauled.

    VA's leader insists that work is already underway.

    In a tense, at times confrontational hearing Wednesday, VA Secretary Bob McDonald responded to a new congressionally mandated report calling for drastic changes throughout the system, citing “shortfalls in overall accountability, role clarity, personal ownership, internal communication and proactive problem-solving.”

    Lawmakers called the scathing report an indictment of systemic problems throughout the department.

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    VA
  • Higher drug co-pays, uniform DoD-VA formulary in defense bill

    Type of content: News

    Easier access to urgent care, higher pharmacy co-pays and a coordinated formulary between the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments are among the changes service members, families and retirees will see in health care as a result of the fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill.

    If the legislation gets past a threatened veto from President Obama over unrelated issues, Tricare beneficiaries will see an uptick in co-payments for prescription medications at retail pharmacies and by mail once the bill, HR 1735, becomes law.

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    DoD
    Legislation
    Physical Well-Being
    VA
  • UCLA and VA launch program to enhance cancer care for veterans

    Type of content: News

    A new collaboration between UCLA and the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System will provide access to the latest therapeutic cancer clinical trials and state-of-the-art care for men and women who have served in the armed forces.

    The Operation Mend Project to Enhance Cancer Care for Veterans will involve three UCLA entities: the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Ronald A. Katz Center for Collaborative Military Medicine and Operation Mend.

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    Collaboration
    Physical Well-Being
    VA
  • For Veterans, Many Prefer A Video Or Phone Call Instead Of An In-Person Meeting Following Surgery

    Type of content: News

    If you’re going in for some form of surgery, chances are you’re more nervous about the surgery itself than the postoperative visit you have lined up afterward. New research on veterans has found many prefer to skip the postoperative visit to a clinic and instead use telehealth systems like video conferencing or phone calls.

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  • 900,000 Veterans May Have Pending Health Care Requests, Watchdog Says

    Type of content: News

    About one-third of the veterans are likely deceased

    (WASHINGTON) — Nearly 900,000 military veterans have officially pending applications for health care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, the department’s inspector general said Wednesday, but “serious” problems with enrollment data make it impossible to determine how many veterans were actively seeking VA health care.

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    Physical Well-Being
    VA
  • Researchers: VA should take lead on brain injury research

    Type of content: News

    The Veterans Affairs Department is uniquely positioned to take a major role in advancing traumatic brain injury research, given its access to thousands of affected patients and partnerships with the nation’s top academic institutions, public health officials said during a two-day conference on military brain injuries in Washington, D.C.

    Organized by VA, the TBI State of the Art Conference brought together public, nonprofit and private-sector researchers to share their work and discuss topics for future exploration.

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    Physical Well-Being
    VA
  • More open collaboration needed on TBI, retired four-star says

    Type of content: News

    Some of the nation’s top minds involved in brain injury research took a tongue-lashing Tuesday from retired Gen. Peter Chiarelli, a former Army vice chief of staff who, in his current position as head of a non-profit that promotes brain science, said the current research architecture hampers medical advancement.

    Speaking to attendees at the Veterans Affairs Traumatic Brain Injury State of the Art Conference in Washington, D.C., Chiarelli said the system recognizes “individual accomplishments and does not recognize team science.”

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    Collaboration
    Mental Health
    Physical Well-Being
  • VA hosting head injury conference in Washington

    Type of content: News

    This recent article highlights the need for Investing in research and treatment of traumatic brain injury can ward off future problems for veterans, including unemployment, homelessness and suicide, Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald said Monday during opening remarks of a two-day conference on head injury in Washington, D.C.

    Drawing more than 300 of the country's top TBI researchers, the VA's State of the Art Conference on traumatic brain injury aims to share cutting-edge approaches to detecting head injuries, treating them and solving related problems.

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    Mental Health
    Physical Well-Being
    VA
  • Hidden damage revealed in veterans' brains from IED blasts

    Type of content: News

    A research team at Johns Hopkins University says they have found a unique honeycomb pattern of broken and swollen nerve fibers in brains of Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans who survived improvised explosive device (IED) blasts, but later died of other causes. In doing so, the team says they may have found the signature of "shell shock" - a problem that has afflicted many soldiers since World War One warfare.

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    Physical Well-Being

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